our first waffles

I’ve been doing a lot of dreaming lately. It keeps me sane. These next few weeks are going to be utterly ridiculous, what with three exams, two big projects, a thesis to turn in and defend and two weekends full of wonderful bridal showers. Yesterday was the “six-weeks-away” marker for our wedding day, and I’m getting more excited by the minute. But also more tired. Isn’t that funny how the past, the present and the future all play together?

Andrew loves waffles and so do I. Once we’re married, with our very own married kitchen and married waffle iron (here’s hoping some benevolent soul gives us one!), we’ll make these — healthy, hearty, happy, yeasted waffles. Sweet and moist and airy with just the right amount of heft.

From Orangette:

“I use one-third buckwheat flour here, and that seems just about right. A word of caution: I wouldn’t use too much buckwheat flour in this recipe, because buckwheat flour is gluten-free, and you need a certain amount of gluten for structure. I’m sure there are other recipes, though, for making gluten-free buckwheat waffles, should you wish to.

“Most waffle recipes work in any kind of waffle maker, but I think this one was made ideally for use on a standard (not Belgian) waffle maker. Mine is Belgian-style, and the batter is a bit too thin to really fill it properly. It’s not a biggie, though. The finished waffles just look prettier on one side than the other.

120 ml (½ cup) warm water
7 grams (1 package; 2 ¼ tsp.) active dry yeast
475 ml (2 cups) whole milk, warmed
113 grams (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 tsp. kosher salt
1 tsp. sugar
170 grams (1 1/3 cups) all-purpose flour
85 grams (2/3 cup) buckwheat flour
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
¼ tsp. baking soda

“Pour the water into a large mixing bowl. (The batter will rise to double its volume, so keep that in mind when you choose the bowl.) Sprinkle the yeast over the water, and let stand to dissolve, about 5 minutes. Then add the milk, butter, salt, sugar, and flours, and stir well, until smooth. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and let it stand overnight at room temperature.

“When you’re ready to cook the waffles, preheat a waffle maker. Follow your waffle maker’s instruction manual for this, but you’ll probably want to heat it on whichever setting is approximately medium-high. My waffle maker has a heat dial that runs from 1 to 7, and I turn it to 5. My waffle maker is nonstick, so I don’t grease it, and Marion Cunningham doesn’t call for greasing it, either.

“Just before cooking the waffles, add the eggs and baking soda to the yeasted batter, and stir to mix well. The batter will be very thin. Pour an appropriate amount of batter into your hot waffle maker: this amount will vary from machine to machine, and you should plan to use your first waffle as a test specimen, which you get the treat of eating while you cook the rest. Cook until golden and crisp.

“Yield: I wind up with 12 Belgian waffles, but yield depends on the size and configuration of your waffle iron.”

I’m dreaming of making these on some lazy Saturday morning, with plenty of maple syrup and French press coffee for the both of us. xoxo

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